ESS Biz Tools
  • Problem Solving and Decision Making

Problem Solving and Decision Making

Leaders are continuously faced with the need to solve problems.  Many are technical in nature and special problem solving tools are available for these purposes. Leaders will also face problems that are more general in nature but are at the same time fundamentally different.  While the us ...Read more
$ AUD 49.50 (each)


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  • Description

Leaders are continuously faced with the need to solve problems.  Many are technical in nature and special problem solving tools are available for these purposes.

Leaders will also face problems that are more general in nature but are at the same time fundamentally different.  While the use of special tools might not be appropriate or necessary for their solution, some form of problem solving methodology will assist leaders and their team members make reasonable decisions.

Different problems require different approaches to their solution.  Remember, when examining ways to approach solving problems be flexible, consider possible contingencies (the ‘what ifs’) – think outside the box!

The purpose of the session is to improve participants’ problem solving and decision making abilities which will enable them to develop better plans.

The session includes information and advice on:

  • One Way – Wrong Way – Turn Back!!  A light hearted approach which is purely for FUN – although some poor managers who leap to blame others might operate this way!  There are too many around – why?
  • Many methods of solving problems exist.  The following are general methods that can be used when group problem solving is undertaken:
  1. Brainstorming Method - a "right brain" creative approach.
  2. Logic or Appreciation Method - a "left brain" or logical approach.
  3. Composite Method

The Composite Method involves first using the Logic Method to identify the key or critical issues that are integral to the problem, then brainstorming them to seek possible solutions and arrive at possible courses of action.  These are examined in terms of achieving the objective and against each other to assess what might go wrong during their implementation.

    • Select the best course, which is then developed into the plan of action to be followed.  Note that the course chosen might be a compromise between, or a combination of, elements of the initial courses.  

Once implementation of the plan has commenced, progress must be evaluated and necessary changes made (hopefully for foreseen contingency ‘what ifs’).

    • Develop an implementation plan.

Supporting information is also contained in lists and diagrams on:

    • Selection of possible courses and "war gaming" them.
    • Developing Implementation Plans.
    • Key Points For Leaders.

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